662 results found for Science.

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What Causes Autism Spectrum Disorders?

What Causes Autism Spectrum Disorders?

In response to the question, "What causes autism spectrum disorders (ASDs)?" the writer is sorely tempted to reply, "We don't know," and move on to the next chapter. However, no guide to ASDs would be complete without an attempt at explaining the causes of the most recent epidemic to hit our planet.

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Updated: May 15, 2019

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Go Play Outside!

Go Play Outside!

Kids of all ages can learn a lot about their connection to the natural world. By exploring what's around them, kids begin to develop investigative skills which will help them later when they have to grasp many different science and math concepts.

Younger Kids Outside

With younger children, I've always found it's better to plan many activities that take short amounts of time, rather than say, a long hike on a cold day.

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Updated: May 15, 2019

Build an Edible Bridge

Build an Edible Bridge

Age: 8 and up
Time: 30 minutes or more
Type of Activity: Science/Engineering

Do your kids ever ask you how bridges work? Why they don't collapse? How much weight they can carry? Turn this fascination into a learning activity. Challenge your kids to build a bridge that can span two chairs and hold the weight of a book or magazine. Have them work together to create the lightest possible bridge that can hold the most weight.

Materials needed:

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Updated: May 15, 2019

The Core Knowledge Curriculum

The Core Knowledge Curriculum

It was first tested in Fort Myers, Florida, in 1990. Based on the premise that a shared body of common knowledge is crucial for citizens of a democracy, "core knowledge" has gone from a philosophy to a growing phenomenon that has revolutionized over 350 schools across the country.

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Using the Web as a Research Tool

Using the Web as a Research Tool

How do you do research on the Web?
First, figure out key words to use in the search. To find sites on the Penobscot Indians, for example, think of other words to describe them. If you just type Penobscot, you'll miss tons of information and get some really off the wall stuff. Instead, try to think of more common, less specific words: Native Americans, American Indians, Native American tribes, etc. Next, I choose a search engine on the Web.

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Updated: May 15, 2019

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Cliques and Fitting In

Cliques and Fitting In

(Brought to you by National PTA)

A Chicago mom confesses that her beautiful sixth-grade daughter cries in her room nightly, afraid she won't look right tomorrow and she will lose her standing in her group at school.

A teacher in Lake Placid, New York, reports that her smart 13-year-old son announced, "Mom, I'm going to fail that science test tomorrow. I just have to, or I won't have any friends."

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by: Trish Kuffner, author of The Toddler's Busy Book

Bubble Solutions

Bubble Solutions


The following three bubble-solution recipes come from Science World in Vancouver, British Columbia. They say the following about glycerine: "Not all detergents require the addition of glycerine in order to make good soap solutions. Glycerine helps soap bubbles hold water and this helps to keep the bubbles from popping. Try a tablespoon or two for a small batch (we're not exact about it). Glycerine can be purchased at most pharmacies. You won't need much, so don't go buying caseloads."

All-Purpose Bubble Solution

Fourth Grade: Short and Sweet Activities

Fourth Grade: Short and Sweet Activities

Why should the learning stop when the kids leave the classroom? Here are some simple things you and your fourth grader can do at home to build academic skills in reading, math, science, and history.

OPEN YOUR MIND'S EYE
As you read a story to your child, occasionally ask, "What does that remind you of? What do you see in your mind?" Mental images are important to ongoing learning. (You and your child might even try sketching images.)

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by: Trish Kuffner, author of The Children's Busy Book

Rock Candy Crystals

Rock candy crystals

Rock Candy Crystals


Here's another activity that demonstrates how chemicals change when they're combined.

Materials

  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • Button with large holes
  • 1 cup water
  • Pencil
  • Medium saucepan
  • Drinking glass or glass jar
  • String

Directions

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Updated: May 15, 2019

Living Green, Learning Green

Living Green, Learning Green

Want to raise environmentally responsible kids in a world of heavy consumption? It isn't easy to get the message across that everything used, consumed, discarded, or thrown away has an environmental cost. For most kids, three of the great mysteries of urban life are:

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Environmental Careers for Young People

Environmental Careers for Young People

As long as the ozone layer continues to shrink, and our reliance on the earth's resources continues to grow, there will be a need for environmental experts. Many colleges offer courses and degrees in environmental studies as preparation for future careers.

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Updated: May 15, 2019

A Second Chance

A Second Chance

Each year, more than 25 percent of U.S. high school students drop out of school, joining the 45 million American adults who lack a diploma. Meanwhile, nearly 85 percent of today's jobs require at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. Perhaps your son or daughter quit school before receiving a high-school diploma. Fortunately, there is a way out of the dead-end job futures facing drop outs: an alternative diploma.

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Logical-Mathematical Quick Tips

Logical-Mathematical Quick Tips

Chances are a child who enjoys playing math computer-games or conducting experiments in the backyard will also be interested in:

  • Going to science museums.

  • Using the nutritional information on food labels to help you create a low-fat, low-calorie family diet plan.

  • Playing monopoly or chess.

  • Helping you determine your budget for your next vacation.

Source: The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development's Professional Development Online.

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The Right Way to Help with Homework

The Right Way to Help with Homework

For science class, Olivia had a month to make something creative using recyclables. She spent her time watching TV while her dad built a life-size prototype of the NASA space shuttle for her using egg crates, bubble wrap, and Chinese take-out boxes.

If Olivia's in first, second, or third grade, don't do her dirty work night after night. Give her the homework support she needs without enrolling yourself in the primary grades again. When you find your place in the homework equation, she'll find hers.

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