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Penmanship

girl learning to write

6 Benefits of Learning Handwriting in School

Is handwriting becoming a lost art? The new Common Core Standards adopted by most states in the U.S. make teaching cursive optional and up to individual states. The rise of technology in and out of the classroom means fewer kids are writing by hand in general. But many psychologists and education experts argue that handwriting — both in print and cursive — is still a highly valuable skill. Read on to learn some of the benefits of putting pen to paper! read more

Address Book

Address BookKeeping track of the addresses of friends and family members helps your child practice his writing skills, learn about alphabetical order, and learn how to write addresses correctly. Materials Pencil, pen, or marker Index cards Ruled paper Blank address book or small notebook Stationery and postage stamps (optional)Directionsread more

ADHD and Handwriting

Many students with ADHD do in fact have problems with the fine motor coordination necessary for writing.read more

ADHD and Written Expression Disorder

Many children with ADHD also have problems with writing, but there are no quick solutions to written expression disorders.read more
Certificate for First Time Writing Your Name

Certificate for First Time Writing Your Name

Print out this certificate to congratulate your child for writing her name for the first time!read more

Clear Thoughts, Messy Handwriting

An inability to get words down on paper doesn't necessarily indicate a lack of intelligence. Here's how to help your child with penmanship.read more

Daughter Diagnosed as Dysgraphic

Find information about the dysfunction called dysgraphia.read more

Factors Affecting Handwriting

Factors Affecting HandwritingThere are many factors that affect handwriting. read more

Fast Thinking, Bad Handwriting

Illegible writing is a common problem for young, gifted boys. Here's what a concerned parent should do.read more

Five-Year-Old Writes Backwards

If a child writes backwards, is there cause for alarm?read more

Gifted, but Handwriting Is Terrible

Gifted children often have skills that are out of sync with their measured intellectual ability.read more

Good Penmanship

When it comes to improving your child's handwriting, practice makes perfect.read more

Handwriting Problems, ADHD, and Self-Esteem

Learn about some great handwriting programs for children.read more

Homeschooling and Handwriting

Five is very young for a child to practice writing skills. Consider having your child work on the alphabet (memorization, letter recognition, and later sounds and combinations), instead.read more
Preschool boy holding red pencil

Kindergarten Prep: Name Writing

Kindergarten Prep: Name WritingThe step following mark-making is letter writing, creating symbols that are recognizable to you and to your child. Young children often make the most progress writing the letters in their name before writing any others. As mentioned in the section on name recognition, a young child is interested in writing her own name because it has meaning to her and she feels a great sense of pride when she can write her name all by herself. read more
Young girl on floor painting picture

Kindergarten Prep: Writing Tools

Kindergarten Prep: Writing ToolsIn learning to write, your child first needs time to explore a variety of writing tools. Over time you will introduce how to hold writing tools properly and your child will begin to perfect her skills in using those tools. For now, the goal is to introduce a variety of writing tools and give your child opportunities to explore those tools as a way to promote her fine-motor strength and skills. read more

Motor Skills Problem in Five-Year-Old

A mother is concerned when her child's teacher talks about her son's "sloppy coloring and handwriting."read more

OT Assessed My Child Incorrectly

A mother complains that an OT evaluation did not pick up on her child's handwriting difficulty.read more

Seven Ways to Help with Handwriting

Seven Ways to Help with HandwritingKids aren't able to write well until they have developed good fine-motor skills. Fortunately, these skills improve easily with lots of practice. Use the following activities to help your young child develop the precision, balance, and hand-eye coordination that are needed to perform the fine-motor skills used in handwriting: 1. Give your child clay or play-dough to play with to strengthen the major muscles used in handwriting. read more

The D'Nealian Handwriting Method

Learn some advantages and disadvantages of the D'Nealian handwriting method.read more

The Struggles of Southpaws

Being left-handed in a right-handed world is a challenge. Here's some advice.read more

Trouble with Handwriting

Could your child's handwriting trouble be hereditary?read more

Writing by Hand

Despite the trend toward computer-based learning, an aversion to writing by hand still needs to be overcome.read more