2032 results found for Homeschooling Your Child with Special Needs.

Updated: May 15, 2019

5 Strategies to Support Your Child with LD

5 Strategies to Support Your Child with LD

Let's face it: Having a learning disability can be discouraging sometimes. Children don't want to feel "different" from other kids. But on the up side, living with a learning disability shapes your child's personality and can make her a better, stronger person. Children with learning disabilities have to give it their all to be successful; they need their parents to be supportive and patient, and to advocate on their behalf when necessary. Here are the five most imporant things you can do:

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Finding an Adoption Agency

Finding an Adoption Agency

How do you locate a reputable and competent adoption agency? Many people merely pick up the Yellow Pages and start dialing every number listed under “Adoption.” Not a good idea. The agency with the splashiest advertisement isn't necessarily the best one. (Although it might be.) Forget about making your agency choice solely by choosing the agency with the nicest website or the cutest photos of babies on the Internet. They might be the right agency for you, but you should check out other agencies, too.

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by: Katy Abel

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From Spiderman to Mom: How Kids Choose Heroes

From Spiderman to Mom: How Kids Choose Heroes

"My Hero"

Seven-year-old Ben S. has three heroes in life: Superman ("because he's really strong and he can punch your head off"), New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady ("because he's really great at football"), and his mom ("because she works really hard at my school").

Eleven-year-old Jacqueline L. cites her parents as her heroes, and rejects the idea that a hero must be famous or especially brave.

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by: Trish Kuffner, author of The Preschooler's Busy Book

Napkin Rings

Napkin Rings


Make napkin rings for a special occasion or to give as a gift.

Materials

  • Empty paper towel or toilet paper rolls
  • Scissors
  • Crayons, paints, stickers, or glitter

Directions

  1. Cut empty paper towel or toilet paper rolls into one-and-a-half-inch pieces.
  2. Have your child decorate them with crayons, paints, stickers, or glitter.
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Updated: January 23, 2020

Let's Talk about Sportsmanship

Let's Talk about Sportsmanship

Talking About Sportsmanship

FOR AGES: Six and up

THE SCENE
Eight-year-old Alissa's soccer team is just about to lose its big game when you see her shove one of her opponents. The referee removes her from the game, and she sits sulking on the sidelines.

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Updated: May 15, 2019

When Good Kids Are Bad Sports

When Good Kids Are Bad Sports

The Scene
Eight-year-old Alissa's soccer team is just about to lose its big game when you see her shove one of her opponents. The referee removes her from the game, and she sits sulking on the sidelines.

It's always upsetting to see your child behave like a bad sport. But you can turn these incidents into conversations about good sportsmanship. Give your child some time to cool off and then approach the subject in a neutral way.

The Words You Need

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Updated: May 29, 2020

The Ultimate Guide to Working From Home With Kids

the ultimate guide to working at home with kids

As parents, we are in unprecedented times right now as we tackle both working from home and guiding our children through their remote learning journeys. Not to mention that we are doing this in a time of crisis as we face the COVID-19 global pandemic. If you’re not used to working from home, that alone would be stressful during normal times. If you’ve never homeschooled, this alone would be challenging.

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Dealing with the Emotional, Physical, and Financial Burdens of Autism

Dealing with the Emotional, Physical, and Financial Burdens of Autism

Of all the questions that parents have during the first few months – or years – after their child has been diagnosed with autism, the one that they may wonder about the most but ask the least is probably, "Will I ever sleep soundly again?" The stress of having a child with a disability is unfathomable: you don't know what the future holds, you don't know whether you're making the right choices, you don't know if you can continue to handle the craziness of your days, and you often don't know how you're going to pay fo
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Updated: April 20, 2020

Homeschooling Parents: This is What a Teacher Needs You to Know

A teacher's advice for parents about homeschooling

One day you find yourself making breakfast, getting dressed for work, packing lunches, and sending your child off to school. The next moment you find yourself working from home (if at all) and becoming your child’s teacher for an indefinite amount of time. Talk about a shock to the system! As a teacher, please know that you can do this! While this abrupt transition has rocked everyone’s world, here are some things that teachers want parents to know about online learning.

Family Travel with an ASD Child

Family Travel with an ASD Child

Traveling can be trying even at the best of times when you have small children. Traveling with a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be even more of a challenge. Airports and train stations are areas that involve lots of waiting. Leaving the security of home for a new place can be off-putting for a child with autism. How you prepare your child depends on his age and how the ASD affects him.

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Adoption: Single with Children

Adoption: Single with Children

Every state in the United States allows single people to adopt. As a result, marital status isn't a legal barrier to adopting a child anywhere. At least, not officially. Many adoption agencies and attorneys, however, still perceive the married couple as the ideal choice for the children they place. So sometimes the single man or woman drops to the end of the adoption line when it comes to priorities—depending on who the adoption arranger is.

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Updated: March 2, 2021

How to Make the Transition from the School Schedule to Summer Mode

transitioning from school schedule to summer mode

While the summer can be fun and a highly anticipated season, it can also create a new level of stress for working parents as they try to figure out how to balance setting up child care, creating a summer schedule, and making sure there are plenty of opportunities for fun. Making summer memories can be some of the most special times of childhood, but leaving the summer plan completely up to chance is not actually stress-free for parents or for children.

Preschoolers Who Aren't in Preschool

Preschoolers Who Aren't in Preschool

Q-tip

Having trouble finding an activity or playgroup that you and your preschooler might enjoy? Try forming a play co-op with other parents of preschoolers in your area. When you have the kids to your home, you'll have a mess to clean up but depending on how many parents and children you include, you'll then have two or three or more playdates that involve no clean-up at all.

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Fun Money

Fun Money

Time

  • 10 to 15 minutes

Materials

  • Newspapers or magazines with grocery coupons

Directions

Work together to go through the newspaper and cut out coupons for things you need to buy, talking about not buying unplanned items just because there is a coupon.

Extensions

  • When you have finished shopping, give your child the money saved with the coupons.
  • Select a local charity together and donate the money saved, in person if possible.

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Toilet Training: How to Coach Your Child

Toilet Training: How to Coach Your Child

If your child starts telling you when she needs to use the potty—or goes by herself—consider yourself blessed. More likely, you will need to help your toddler out at least some of the time.

In her first weeks out of a diaper, watch your child like a mother hen. You will easily recognize your child's body signals:

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by: Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities

Tips for Developing Healthy Self-Esteem in Your Child

Tips for Developing Healthy Self-Esteem in Your Child

Most parents are aware that their child's feelings of self-worth are linked to social and academic success, but they sometimes don't realize how easy it is to damage their child's self-esteem. Research shows that children with learning disabilities are especially likely to suffer from a lack of self-esteem, but all children benefit when their parents take steps to help them develop positive feelings of self-worth. The Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities and Dr.

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