11 Ways to Help Your Child Prepare for Tests

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by: Lindsay Hutton
To help children prepare adequately for tests (whether teacher-made or standardized), you can do several things to provide support and create a positive test-taking experience.
Pile of open books on table.
Study the Material
The best way to prepare for tests is to study, know the work, and take the right courses.
Frustrated boy sitting with head in hands surrounded by books.
Help Your Child Relax
If your child is nervous at test time, ask her teacher for tips on helping her relax.
Closeup of young girl concentrating on school work.
Plan Your Schedule Accordingly
Make sure that your child is in school during the testing sessions. Do not plan any doctor or dental appointments on test dates.
Back view of father and son talking on playground
Ask Your Child How He Did
Make sure that you are aware of your child's performance and that you can help interpret the results when they become available.
Close up of scantron sheet and pencil.
Know How the Results Will Affect Your Child
Remember to keep well-informed about your child's tests. Know how test results are used, and how they will affect your child's placement in school.
Parent and teacher sitting in classroom talking.
Take Action
If there are major differences between standardized test scores and school grades, find out why.
Mother helping daughter do homework.
Set a Study Schedule
Encourage your child to study over a period of time rather than "cram" the night before.
Eager students raising hands in classroom.
Speak Up
Encourage your child to listen carefully to all test-taking directions given by the teacher and to ask questions about any directions that are unclear.
Young girl sleeping.
Get Some Sleep
See that your child gets his/her regular amount of sleep before the tests and is well-rested.
Plate of waffles and berries on table.
Eat a Nutritious Breakfast
Make sure that your child eats his/her usual breakfast on the day of the test. Hunger can detract from a good test performance.
Close up of two parents kissing happy child's cheeks.
Be Her Cheerleader
Encourage your child to do his/her best.

Brought to you by the American School Counselor Association