8 Breakfasts Kids Can "Cook" Themselves

Sponsored

ABC Mouse Banner

by: Lindsay Hutton
Even the littlest hands can help out in the kitchen, and involving your child in meal preparation is an important lesson in responsibility and self-sufficiency. With just a little prep ahead of time from you, these simple ideas allow your child to make a complete breakfast all on her own — great for those busy school mornings when every minute counts!
Yougrt Parfait with fruit and granola
Yogurt Parfait
Keep some single serve yogurts and cut up fruit on a shelf in the fridge that your child can reach. Along with a little sprinkle of granola, a yogurt parfait is an easy (and healthy!) no-cook breakfast that is super simple for your child to put together.
Toast topped with peanut butter and banana
Toast and Fruit
Children can usually start using kitchen appliances around age 6, and whole wheat toast is a great first dish your child can "cook" on her own. A couple slices complete with her favorite nut butter and a sliced up banana are a hearty way to start the morning. If your child has nut allergies — or just isn't a fan of nut butters — strawberry jam, or some butter and a little sprinkle of cinnamon and sugar paired with a piece of fruit are a few other easy options.

Supervise your child the first couple times to make sure you feel comfortable allowing her to use the toaster on her own, and be sure to teach her proper toaster safety, such as never sticking a utensil inside it and allowing the food to cool for a minute or so before removing it. Also, only allow her to use a dull butter knife for spreading toppings and cutting up bananas, and make sure she is well-versed on knife safety.

Bowl of Cereal with Blueberries
Cereal
Cold cereal with milk is a snap for your child to prepare. Just make sure to keep the milk in an easy-to-reach spot in the fridge, and practice pouring together to help avoid any major spills.
Sliced hard-boiled egg
Hard-Boiled Eggs
Hard-boiled eggs are a simple make-ahead item that keep well in the fridge for up to one week. Your child can grab and peel one himself, and when paired with a piece of fruit or toast, eggs are a great protein-filled way to start the day.
Bowl of Oatmeal with Nuts and Fruit
Instant Oatmeal
Although every child is different, according to Home Food Safety a general rule of thumb is a child is old enough to use a microwave when he can read food preparation instructions on a package and understand a microwave's keypad. Instant oatmeal is a good first meal to allow your child to make when using the microwave on his own, and also makes a filling breakfast. He can add some peanut butter, dried fruit, nuts, or seeds for a little added texture.

Always discuss microwave safety before allowing your child to use it on his own — use this printable microwave safety sheet for kids to make sure you cover everything.

If you have time for a little make-ahead prep, baked oatmeal squares are a great substitute for instant oatmeal and are perfect for mornings your child may need to eat his breakfast on the run. Make and cut a batch using your own healthy recipe, or try this one, and store in an air-tight container for easy grabbing.

Stack of waffles with fruit and syrup
Frozen Waffles
Whole grain frozen waffles are convenient for busy weekday mornings. Your child can simply pop one or two in the toaster, top it with cut up fruit and syrup, and enjoy!

Homemade waffles and pancakes can also be made over the weekend and frozen for a quick weekday warm-up.

Bagel with Cream Cheese
Bagel and Cream Cheese
Another easy idea for toaster-age kids are pre-sliced bagels (or English muffins), topped with peanut butter, cream cheese, or even a diced up hard-boiled egg for a punch of protein. Your child can make it a complete breakfast with a piece of fruit or a glass of 100% fruit juice.
Fresh blueberry muffins
Pre-Made Muffins
If you have some spare time over the weekend, make a big batch of homemade muffins and keep them in an air-tight container in an easy-to-reach spot. It's worth the little extra time if it means your child can grab one, pour herself a glass of real fruit juice, and have a complete meal without needing your help!