6 Strategies to Help Your Child with LD Succeed

Sponsored

ABC Mouse Banner

by: Lindsay Hutton
If you have a child with a learning disability, you know how hard it can be to get him excited about schoolwork. Check out these tips and strategies from our readers that will help your child accomplish his goals, and encourage him to go that extra mile.
MotivatingLDChildren,ScrapbookSupplies
Show Him He's a Star
Documenting your child's successes is a great way to show him how far he has come and motivate him to keep going for it. One reader suggests making a scrapbook of all his accomplishments that he can share with his teachers, friends, and family. This form of positive feedback can be great for his self-esteem.
MotivatingLDChildren,GoldStar,NiceJob,Homework
And the Envelope, Please?
Rewarding your child for a job well done is always a great motivator. Place your child's different learning goals into separate envelopes, along with a small prize, such as a movie ticket. Every time a learning goal is accomplished, your child can celebrate.
MotivatingLDChildren,CountingCoins,ChildandMother
Learn Through Everyday Tasks
This strategy is a great way to spend a little time with your child at the end of the day, as well as help him with everyday tasks, like counting money.

Empty your pockets of all the spare change you've accumulated during the day, and help your child count it. If he gets it right, he gets to keep the change!

MotivatingLDChildren,Computer,TeenandParent
Job Skills Search
If you are a parent of an older child, one reader reminds us that teaching job skills is an important strategy. Sit down with your child and ask her what she wants to do when she grows up.

Once you have a list of jobs that interest her, brainstorm the skills she will need to accomplish this job, and turn them into learning goals for the summer or upcoming school year.

MotivatingLDChildren,HappyChild,Painting
Work for Rewards
Ask your child to generate a list of all the fun activities he wants to do during summer vacation or the school year. Review the list together and decide which activities can be accomplished with "no strings attached."

The remaining activities can be used as rewards when he accomplishes a specific learning goal or task. You can turn this into a team strategy by making a list of your own personal goals, and working alongside your child to accomplish them.

MotivatingLDChildren,DoingHomework,YoungStudent
Work in Advance
A child with LD often gets frustrated with the amount of schoolwork she gets during the school year. Talk to your child's school to see if she can work during the summer to complete tasks ahead of time, such as reading chapters in a book, or researching topics that will be covered in the upcoming year.

One reader offers ways to make completing assignment fun, such as surfing the Internet for interesting websites on specific topics, or creating a puppet show or skit to demonstrate her understanding of a book she just read. She'll be having so much fun, she won't even realize she's preparing for the school year.