Meaning and Origin of: Hay

Family name origins & meanings

  • Scottish and English : topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye (Old English(ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin). Alternatively, it may be a habitational name from any of various places named with this word, including Les Hays and La Haye in Normandy. The Old French and Middle English word was used in particular to denote an enclosed forest. Compare Haywood. This name was taken to Ireland (County Wexford) by the Normans.
  • Scottish and English : nickname for a tall man, from Middle Englishhay, hey ‘tall’, ‘high’ (Old English hēah).
  • Scottish and English : from the medieval personal name Hay, which represented in part the Old English byname Hēah‘tall’, in part a short form of the various compound names with the first element hēah ‘high’.
  • French : topographic name from a masculine form of Old French haye ‘hedge’, or a habitational name from Les Hays, Jura, or Le Hay, Seine-Maritime.
  • Spanish : topographic name from haya ‘beech tree’ (ultimately derived from Latin fagus).
  • German : occupational name from Middle High German heie ‘guardian’, ‘custodian’ (see Hayer).
  • Dutch and Frisian : variant ofHaye 1.
  • The surname Hay is particularly common in Scotland, where it has been established since 1160. The principal family of the name are of Norman origin; they trace their descent from William de la Haye, who was butler of Scotland in the reign of Malcolm IV (1153–65). They hold the titles marquess of Tweeddale, earl of Kinnoul, and earl of Erroll. The earl of Erroll also holds the hereditary office of constable of Scotland, first bestowed on the family by Robert I in 1314.