Poetry Terms

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How much do you know about poetry? Take this quiz and find out!

Quiz

1. Haiku originated in:

  • France.
  • China.
  • Japan.

2. A type of poetry that does not require rhyme or metrical structure is called:

  • Litotes.
  • Free verse.
  • Narrative.

3. "World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings" (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

The above line is an example of:

  • Alliteration.
  • Apostrophe.
  • Antithesis.

4. Personification is:

  • Writing poems about people.
  • Writing about things as if they were people.
  • A poem written for a specific person.

5. "Hope is the thing with feathers—/ That perches on the soul—" (Emily Dickinson)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Metaphor.
  • Simile.
  • Pentameter.

6. "Let me not to the marriage of true minds/ Admit impediments . . ." (William Shakespeare)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Conceit.
  • Consonance.
  • Canzone.

7. A word used to imitate a sound is known as:

  • An ode.
  • Ottava rima.
  • Onomatopoeia.

8. All Shakespearean sonnets end with a:

  • Spondee.
  • Couplet.
  • Senryu.

9. Similes are different from metaphors in that they:

  • Use the word like or as.
  • Compare two things that are similar.
  • Compare things not related.

10. "Why does a boy who's fast as a jet/ Take all day—and sometimes two—/ To get to school?" (John Ciardi)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Idyll.
  • Heptameter.
  • Hyperbole.

1. Haiku originated in:
Japan.

2. A type of poetry that does not require rhyme or metrical structure is called:
Free verse.

3. "World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings" (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

The above line is an example of:
Alliteration.

4. Personification is:
Writing about things as if they were people.

5. "Hope is the thing with feathers—/ That perches on the soul—" (Emily Dickinson)

The above lines are an example of:
Metaphor.

6. "Let me not to the marriage of true minds/ Admit impediments . . ." (William Shakespeare)

The above lines are an example of:
Consonance.

7. A word used to imitate a sound is known as:
Onomatopoeia.

8. All Shakespearean sonnets end with a:
Couplet.

9. Similes are different from metaphors in that they:
Use the word like or as.

10. "Why does a boy who's fast as a jet/ Take all day—and sometimes two—/ To get to school?" (John Ciardi)

The above lines are an example of:
Hyperbole.

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