Talking Sticks and Public Speaking - FamilyEducation

Talking Sticks and Public Speaking

by Andrea Mulder-Slater

Make a talking stick with your kids, and use it to keep the peace at family meetings.

Age: Elementary and up
Time: 30 minutes or more
Type of Activity: Art

Are you and your kids planning on a nature walk in the near future? During your stroll, take the time to stop and pick up a couple of fallen branches. Why? Because you just might find some magic in those twigs. Simply gather sticks from the ground, paint, brushes and water containers, feathers, leather cording, beads, glue, and a magic marker or two.

Materials needed:

  • Sticks
  • Paint
  • Brushes
  • Water containers
  • Feathers
  • Leather cording
  • Beads
  • Glue
  • Magic markers

    What to do:

    Step One: Ready, set, go and clean your stick by washing away any bits of dirt or moss.

    Step Two: Great, now paint that stick using your favorite colors. If you find that your paint is too runny, add a touch of white glue.

    Step Three: Once the stick is covered with paint, let it dry and plan out some fun designs and symbols. A symbol is a picture or image that tells a story without using words, like a sunshine or moon face.

    Step Four: Draw your symbols on the painted stick using magic markers.

    Step Five: Next, string some colorful beads onto the leather cording, making sure to tie off the ends.

    Step Six: Tie the leather with the beads onto one end of your stick, leaving some extra hanging down.

    Step Seven: Finally, glue a couple of feathers to the end of your leather cording, hold the stick and wish away!

    Facts:
    In many native cultures, a talking stick was used during gatherings between a group or circle of people. Those in attendance were not allowed to speak until they had their turn holding the talking stick. Whenever a member of the group was speaking, all eyes and ears were focused on him/her. This talking tool ensured that everyone had their say in whatever matters were discussed.

    Now you know.

    © Andrea Mulder-Slater | KinderArt | http://www.kinderart.com

  • Please don't delete it