Smart Parenting

Take our family therapist's quiz on tough childhood issues. It's the fastest way on the Web to get smart about parenting.

Quiz

Take our family therapist's quiz on tough childhood issues. It's the fastest way on the Web to get smart about parenting.

1. Three-year-old Susan is having a temper tantrum -- screaming, kicking, and flailing uncontrollably on the kitchen floor -- because her mom would not give her candy. How should her mom respond?

  • Leave the room because tantrums are fueled by attention.
  • Remain physically close to the child, but don't pick her up, and let the tantrum run its course.
  • Try to reason with her, speaking calmly and softly.

2. Eight-year-old Jason has worked hard to improve his schoolwork and has brought home a report card with all As -- a first for him. Which is the best parental response?

  • "You've made a lot of progress, especially in math and science, which were your toughest subjects. You must be pleased with your hard work. How do you feel about it?"
  • "This is great! We knew you could do it. Now you know that you can do this all the time, right?"
  • "All As! We're so proud of you!"

3. Children usually have great difficulty coping with their parents' divorce. Which of the following approaches is the best way to help kids adjust to divorce?

  • Don't show your grief in front of your kids.
  • If your spouse's actions truly caused the divorce, it's okay to tell your kids that he/she (your spouse) is to blame for the family's breakup.
  • Adhere to regular family routines whenever possible.

4. Childhood night terrors are not a type of nightmare. They are the scary, half-awake panic reactions children experience, usually within the first four hours of nighttime sleep. Children may sit bolt upright, scream, and flail during these episodes with their eyes either closed or open. What should you do when your child has a night terror?

  • Stay close to her but do not intervene.
  • Hug your child or physically restrain him.
  • Try to wake your child gently.

5. About 50 percent of teens age 15 to 19 and 65 percent of 18-year-old girls have had sex. Studies show that adolescents are less likely to engage in sex at an early age and to have unprotected sex if their parents have discussed sex with them. How can a mother best educate her adolescent daughter about sex?

  • Teach her your morals and beliefs about sex and be sure hers are the same.
  • Don't initiate discussions about sex with her. It will only encourage her curiosity and experimentation.
  • Have a series of ongoing discussions about sex as opposed to the one "big talk."

Your Results:

1. Three-year-old Susan is having a temper tantrum -- screaming, kicking, and flailing uncontrollably on the kitchen floor -- because her mom would not give her candy. How should her mom respond?
Remain physically close to the child, but don't pick her up, and let the tantrum run its course.

2. Eight-year-old Jason has worked hard to improve his schoolwork and has brought home a report card with all As -- a first for him. Which is the best parental response?
"You've made a lot of progress, especially in math and science, which were your toughest subjects. You must be pleased with your hard work. How do you feel about it?"

3. Children usually have great difficulty coping with their parents' divorce. Which of the following approaches is the best way to help kids adjust to divorce?
Adhere to regular family routines whenever possible.

4. Childhood night terrors are not a type of nightmare. They are the scary, half-awake panic reactions children experience, usually within the first four hours of nighttime sleep. Children may sit bolt upright, scream, and flail during these episodes with their eyes either closed or open. What should you do when your child has a night terror?
Stay close to her but do not intervene.

5. About 50 percent of teens age 15 to 19 and 65 percent of 18-year-old girls have had sex. Studies show that adolescents are less likely to engage in sex at an early age and to have unprotected sex if their parents have discussed sex with them. How can a mother best educate her adolescent daughter about sex?
Have a series of ongoing discussions about sex as opposed to the one "big talk."

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