U.S. Constitution Quiz: The Executive and Judicial Branches

Test your knowledge of Articles II and III of the U.S. Constitution, which lay out the powers of the Executive and Judicial branches.

Quiz

Test your knowledge of Articles II and III of the U.S. Constitution, which lay out the powers of the Executive and Judicial branches.

1. The main job of the President is to:

  • Make laws.
  • Carry out the laws.
  • Choose electors.
  • Take the oath of office.

2. Which of the following is not a power of the President?

  • To act as commander in chief of the armed forces.
  • To appoint ambassadors with consent of the Senate.
  • To choose the president of the Senate.
  • To make treaties.

3. The President can be removed from office for:

  • Committing treason.
  • Making an unpopular speech.
  • Breaking a promise to the people who elected him.
  • Vetoing a bill.

4. Which person could be elected President?

  • A 35-year-old woman, born in Russia.
  • A 40-year-old man, born in the United States, but living in Britain from age 5 to age 30.
  • A 50-year-old woman, born in the United States.
  • A 30-year-old man, born in the United States.

5. According to the Constitution, how is the President elected?

  • By receiving a majority of the electoral votes.
  • By receiving the majority of the votes cast on election day.
  • By getting the most votes in any 27 states.
  • By gaining approval from a majority of state legislatures.

6. Which phrase best completes this sentence? "The judicial branch _____."

  • Is a lawmaking body.
  • Helps the President carry out laws.
  • Consists of federal courts.
  • Has no role in interpreting the meaning of the Constitution.

7. Which phrase best completes this sentence? "Article III _____."

  • Tells how many federal courts there will be.
  • Describes the scope of federal power.
  • Names the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.
  • Gives the Supreme Court the power to hold trials for any crime the Justices think is important enough.

8. According to Article III, federal judges hold office:

  • For two years.
  • For four years.
  • For six years.
  • For life.

9. The Supreme Court has the right to:

  • Review decisions of the inferior courts.
  • Set up inferior courts.
  • Set punishment for traitors.
  • Impeach the President.

10. Which of the following is an example of a situation when a person may be convicted of treason?

  • The person is seen speaking against the government.
  • Two people testify that they saw the person giving weapons to an enemy soldier during war.
  • The person writes a letter describing plans to make war against the country.
  • The President says the person committed an act of treason.

Your Results:

1. The main job of the President is to:
Carry out the laws.

2. Which of the following is not a power of the President?
To choose the president of the Senate.

3. The President can be removed from office for:
Committing treason.

4. Which person could be elected President?
A 50-year-old woman, born in the United States.

5. According to the Constitution, how is the President elected?
By receiving a majority of the electoral votes.

6. Which phrase best completes this sentence? "The judicial branch _____."
Consists of federal courts.

7. Which phrase best completes this sentence? "Article III _____."
Describes the scope of federal power.

8. According to Article III, federal judges hold office:
For life.

9. The Supreme Court has the right to:
Review decisions of the inferior courts.

10. Which of the following is an example of a situation when a person may be convicted of treason?
Two people testify that they saw the person giving weapons to an enemy soldier during war.

60% Complete