Do You Know How to Keep Your Middle-Schooler Safe? - FamilyEducation

Do You Know How to Keep Your Middle-Schooler Safe?

Find out what you need to do to keep your child out of harm's way. Take this quiz, based on Gavin de Becker's best-selling book, Protecting the Gift.

Quiz

Find out what you need to do to keep your child out of harm's way. Take this quiz, based on Gavin de Becker's best-selling book, Protecting the Gift.

1. Your 11-year-old expresses a dislike for his soccer coach, especially when the coach asks him to stay late for extra practice. You talk to your son, who says he doesn't like being alone with the coach. You feel your son:

  • Needs to know that playing a sport can be hard work and may require extra effort on his part. He should be glad the coach is giving him the opportunity to improve his game.
  • Is expressing fear.
  • Is embarrassing you, since you respect his coach's authority and abilities and expect your son to do the same.
  • Needs to be taught a lesson in manners. He should always respect his elders.

2.
Your 12-year-old occasionally defies you. Her behavior makes you feel that she:

  • Is rebellious and needs to be taught a lesson in obeying her parents.
  • Is impolite, rude, and unladylike.
  • Is just a typical, exasperating preteen.
  • May be learning a good behavior.

3.
Your preteen daughter wants to start walking to and from school with the other kids from the neighborhood. After all, everyone else has been walking since last year. You tell her:

  • ''Too bad! I don't care if everyone else is doing it, I want you to always take the bus.''
  • ''OK, why not? Your best friend has been doing it for the last year with no problems and she's even a year younger than you.''
  • ''We'll see if you're ready.''

4.
Your 13-year-old son wants to go to a new friend's house for a sleepover on Friday. His best friend is also invited, and that boy's mom has already said yes. How should you respond?

  • "Yes. It sounds like fun."
  • "Absolutely not."
  • "Maybe." (You don't want want to embarrass your son by appearing like an overprotective parent!)

1. Your 11-year-old expresses a dislike for his soccer coach, especially when the coach asks him to stay late for extra practice. You talk to your son, who says he doesn't like being alone with the coach. You feel your son:
Is expressing fear.

2.
Your 12-year-old occasionally defies you. Her behavior makes you feel that she:
May be learning a good behavior.

3.
Your preteen daughter wants to start walking to and from school with the other kids from the neighborhood. After all, everyone else has been walking since last year. You tell her:
''We'll see if you're ready.''

4.
Your 13-year-old son wants to go to a new friend's house for a sleepover on Friday. His best friend is also invited, and that boy's mom has already said yes. How should you respond?
"Maybe." (You don't want want to embarrass your son by appearing like an overprotective parent!)

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