Poetry Terms - FamilyEducation

Poetry Terms

How much do you know about poetry? Take this quiz and find out!

Quiz

How much do you know about poetry? Take this quiz and find out!

1. Haiku originated in:

  • France.
  • China.
  • Japan.

2. A type of poetry that does not require rhyme or metrical structure is called:

  • Litotes.
  • Free verse.
  • Narrative.

3. "World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings" (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

The above line is an example of:

  • Alliteration.
  • Apostrophe.
  • Antithesis.

4. Personification is:

  • Writing poems about people.
  • Writing about things as if they were people.
  • A poem written for a specific person.

5. "Hope is the thing with feathers—/ That perches on the soul—" (Emily Dickinson)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Metaphor.
  • Simile.
  • Pentameter.

6. "Let me not to the marriage of true minds/ Admit impediments . . ." (William Shakespeare)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Conceit.
  • Consonance.
  • Canzone.

7. A word used to imitate a sound is known as:

  • An ode.
  • Ottava rima.
  • Onomatopoeia.

8. All Shakespearean sonnets end with a:

  • Spondee.
  • Couplet.
  • Senryu.

9. Similes are different from metaphors in that they:

  • Use the word like or as.
  • Compare two things that are similar.
  • Compare things not related.

10. "Why does a boy who's fast as a jet/ Take all day—and sometimes two—/ To get to school?" (John Ciardi)

The above lines are an example of:

  • Idyll.
  • Heptameter.
  • Hyperbole.

1. Haiku originated in:
Japan.

2. A type of poetry that does not require rhyme or metrical structure is called:
Free verse.

3. "World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings" (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

The above line is an example of:
Alliteration.

4. Personification is:
Writing about things as if they were people.

5. "Hope is the thing with feathers—/ That perches on the soul—" (Emily Dickinson)

The above lines are an example of:
Metaphor.

6. "Let me not to the marriage of true minds/ Admit impediments . . ." (William Shakespeare)

The above lines are an example of:
Consonance.

7. A word used to imitate a sound is known as:
Onomatopoeia.

8. All Shakespearean sonnets end with a:
Couplet.

9. Similes are different from metaphors in that they:
Use the word like or as.

10. "Why does a boy who's fast as a jet/ Take all day—and sometimes two—/ To get to school?" (John Ciardi)

The above lines are an example of:
Hyperbole.

60% Complete