What Is Your Approach to Discipline?

Are your discipline methods strict, lenient, or somewhere in-between? Take our quiz and find out.

Quiz

Are your discipline methods strict, lenient, or somewhere in-between? Take our quiz and find out.

1. Your toddler wants to play with a breakable glass object on a hard kitchen floor. You:

  • Ignore her; you never liked that set of glasses anyway.
  • Remove the child and the object and redirect the toddler's attention.
  • Slap her hand and shout, "You know better than that!"

2. You and your child are at the local department store. Your child insists on having a new toy. When his needs are not met, he begins to have a temper tantrum and throws himself to the floor. You:

  • Scream louder than your child and insist that you are not happy with this behavior.
  • Remove the child from the store. Hold the child gently until the toddler gains control.
  • Give in, realizing you'd rather have your child stop crying than to be humiliated in front of all these people.

3. Your preschooler draws on the wall with crayons. You:

  • Put your child on time-out to allow her to think about the misbehavior. Afterwards, let the child clean up the mess.
  • Quietly say, "That's a nice picture, but you shouldn't draw on the wall." Then walk away.
  • Shout, "That is unacceptable! I'm never going to buy you crayons again!"

4. Your child destroys his toys. You:

  • Tell him that this will be the last time you take a toy to the store to be repaired.
  • Don't replace the toys. Let your child learn that if he destroys his toys, he'll have nothing to play with.
  • Shout at him that no one will ever want to play with him if he keeps ruining his toys.

5. Every time you take a phone call, your child whines, "Mommy, pleeeeeeeease play with me." You:

  • Shout, "Can't you see that I'm on the phone? I'll be with you when I am done talking!!"
  • Hang up immediately. You certainly don't want to hear that for the next 10 minutes.
  • Say to her that you don't understand her when she speaks like that. When she uses her regular voice you will be able to listen to her.

Your Results:

1. Your toddler wants to play with a breakable glass object on a hard kitchen floor. You:
Slap her hand and shout, "You know better than that!"

2. You and your child are at the local department store. Your child insists on having a new toy. When his needs are not met, he begins to have a temper tantrum and throws himself to the floor. You:
Give in, realizing you'd rather have your child stop crying than to be humiliated in front of all these people.

3. Your preschooler draws on the wall with crayons. You:
Shout, "That is unacceptable! I'm never going to buy you crayons again!"

4. Your child destroys his toys. You:
Shout at him that no one will ever want to play with him if he keeps ruining his toys.

5. Every time you take a phone call, your child whines, "Mommy, pleeeeeeeease play with me." You:
Say to her that you don't understand her when she speaks like that. When she uses her regular voice you will be able to listen to her.

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