10 Signs and Symptoms of Postpartum Depression

Is it just the "baby blues," or something more serious? While it's common for new moms to feel sad or moody after giving birth, intense emotions and disturbing thoughts for prolonged periods can be signs of postpartum depression (PPD). According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 13 percent of women experience depression during and after pregnancy. Read on for the signs and symptoms of PPD so you can seek help if you think you or your partner might be suffering from this illness. read more

Dealing with Postpartum Depression: One Woman's Story

Dealing with Postpartum Depression: One Woman's Story After my third child was born I developed what I thought was postpartum depression. I was in a stressful second marriage and noticed that all during this pregnancy (following so quickly on the heels of my second child's birth) I was more emotionally volatile, insecure, and weepy. I needed a lot of support that my husband did not know how to give me. read more

I Have a Beautiful Baby. Why Do I Feel So Terrible?

I Have a Beautiful Baby. Why Do I Feel So Terrible?A friend of ours says that when she was about six months along in her pregnancy, it seemed as if every woman in her life who had ever been pregnant – from her mother to her friends, cousins, and coworkers – began recounting their worst horror stories about pregnancy. However, when her water broke and she went into labor, it began to dawn on her that no amount of shared experience could ever prepare her for what is one of the most intense, intimate rites of passage in a woman's life: the initiation into motherhood. read more

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Depression Baby Doctor If depression persists and has a negative impact on your appetite and your ability to sleep, or if it leads to feelings of apathy, hopelessness, suicidal urges, or urges to harm your baby, get professional help immediately! Such profound and lasting depression not only represents a threat to you, but will also adversely affect your relationship with your baby and may interfere with his development. read more

Postpartum Depression: Not for Women Only

Postpartum Depression: Not for Women Only Baby Doctor If your depression persists for more than a couple of months, you may find it worthwhile to seek professional help. Feeling depressed? Wishing that you could share in the joy of having a new baby, but you're feeling left cold for some reason? You're not alone. More than half of new fathers experience their own version of postpartum depression. Fortunately, the depression of new fathers, like that of new mothers, usually passes relatively quickly. read more

Recognizing Postpartum Depression

Recognizing Postpartum Depression Mom-isms Postpartum depression (PPD) is the term for any downswings in mood that women may suffer after giving birth. While a supportive partner and network of friends can help with normal depression, serious PPDs are hormonally induced and require a doctor's attention. read more

The Problem of Postpartum Depression

The Problem of Postpartum Depression During your pregnancy, you knew from your reading to expect emotional changes, but now you may be overwhelmed by worry and sadness. Where is the happiness you know you should be feeling? The fact that it seems beyond your grasp makes you feel even worse. Despite being exhausted from the responsibilities of new motherhood, you lie awake at night worrying about your baby's health and your ability to mother him or her. During the day, you are constantly anxious about harm befalling your baby. read more

Watching for Postpartum Depression

Watching for Postpartum Depression E Alert The consequences of depression being unrecognized and untreated can be tragic for the whole family. Be sure to get help for your baby's mother if you think she is having problems with postpartum depression. read more